Before We Get Started …

Ol’ Blackrims looking unto the bright future that is the next art season!

I was going to write a really sentimental piece on this past art season.  It totally would’ve made you cry.  No time, though.

You’re likely putting finishing touches on your latest masterpiece, tying up loose ends before the next exhibit, taking care of the last edits on your preview blog post, or just totally hyped for the art to get going again.  Now that I’ve got my first art season as a blogger under my belt (sort of – I got started half way through) I’m looking forward to my second.

A lot has happened in our little art world over the course of the last year.  Specifically, I feel like a few developments have changed or clarified the role Art at Bay should play.  With the goal of keeping you informed on Tampa Bay art, I thought I’d let you in on what I’ve been thinking.

The Tampa Bay art scene blogosphere (admittedly, a very specific sphere) has blown up this year along with the rest of the Bay area art world.  Alright, maybe “blown up” is overstating it a bit.  In regards to finding words on our art scene now, here’s where I go for what:

So, doing a quick look-over of the local blogosphere and my blog I’ve come up with a couple of conclusions:

  1. With local art information aplenty I should offer less this season – there isn’t exactly a shortage of it.  Assuming, we’re all informed, its time to begin talking about how we feel on issues unique to our scene and act on it.
  2. Though Art at Bay may have comparatively few readers – looking over the FB ‘like’ list you guys seem to be our art world who’s-who: each of you appear to have some sort of hand on the wheel steering this crazy thing.  I intend for Art at Bay to focus more on the conversation of how and where it should be steered.

Anyhow, I hope you stick with me for the upcoming season.  More importantly, I hope you join the conversation.

Before We Get Started …

Art@Bay at Sarasota Visual Art – Art Getting to Work

Duncan McClellan Glass

If art neighborhoods were personified perhaps St. Petersburg’s 600 Block would be a skinny-jeans-and-Chucks hipster.  Tampa’s Seminole Heights might be tweed jacketed; scruffy but mature.  However, there is a new neighborhood you’d probably find in blue jeans and blue-collar: the Warehouse Arts District.

Read the rest of the article here

Art@Bay at Sarasota Visual Art – Art Getting to Work

Art@Bay at Sarasota Visual Art – Like Water, Plain Yet Potent

Flush the toilet, wash down a pill, take a bath, drive through the rain, swig a bottle of Dasani, drown.  Despite its ubiquitous nature (or perhaps because of it) water makes for incredibly potent symbolism – a potency that is not lost on artist Michelle Fader.  As a theme, water flows through Michelle Fader’s solo exhibit, Toward Evening, at the USF Centre Gallery.

Read the rest of the article here

Art@Bay at Sarasota Visual Art – Like Water, Plain Yet Potent

Information Overlord’s Weekend Reading Guide – 2/11-2/12

This could be the legacy of our generation...or that's what I got from the first link.Like Scar is to Mufasa, like Gaston is to the Beast, so will this weekend’s reading guide be to last week’s.  Last weekend I gave our lazy brains a respite from reading.  However, I know my readers are an intellectual bunch with minds that require regular and rigorous exertion.  This weekend’s reading guide is a cerebral one.

  • From my new favorite site is this article on the mind-liquefying world of 4chan, “alienation, irony, autonomy, [and] discourse”.  Auerbach serves up a critical look at the home of both the cyber-activists Anonymous and the lolcats meme.  Check it out here.
  • The local online art review and literary mag Ubernothing released its fifth issue about a month ago and is now accepting submissions for issue VI.  Not only will you likely enjoy the reading, but a little local is good for the character.  You can find issue five here.
  • The interview with Nathan Skiles at Sarasota Visual Art was a good read, particularly if you appreciate his abstracty sculpturish work.  Skiles had some especially interesting things to say about representation, abstraction, and blurring the two.  You can read the interview here.
Information Overlord’s Weekend Reading Guide – 2/11-2/12