Tampa Bay and St.Pete Art Events: 10/3 -10/11/2013

subSURFACE, Mixed Media by Stacy Rosende, Opens Oct. 3 (Reception is Thu., Oct. 10, 5-7 p.m., including an artist talk on color, texture and meaning, around 6 p.m) at HCC Dale Mabry Gallery

Sharing her observations and impressions through oil and wax paintings, elaborate monotype prints, and cast sculptures, local artist Stacy Rosende expresses to the viewer how her experiences in her recent residency in Venice helped shift her focus and experimentation in her works. Free admission.

Mixing Metaphors: The Aesthetic, the Social and the Political in African American Art, Works from the Bank of America Collection– Opens Oct.5th at the Museum of Fine Arts in St.Pete

Screen Shot 2013-10-03 at 6.16.19 PMSource: http://www.uwishunu.com

A group of African American artists take on real-world and aesthetic issues from family life to abstraction. “Mixing Metaphors” gathers together approximately 100 paintings, prints, photographs and sculptures by 36 artists including Carrie Mae Weems, Dawoud Bey, Romare Bearden, Lorna Simpson, Faith Ringgold and Jacob Lawrence.

Sea of Tranquility –Opens Oct.5th at the Tampa Museum of Art

Belgian artist Hans Op de Beeck’s 2010 art movie “Sea of Tranquillity” makes a debut at the Tampa Museum of Art. Op de Beeck’s 30-minute video places a cast of human actors aboard the digitally animated ship. Op de Beeck’s striking visual compositions keep a viewer riveted.

Arp, Calder, and Miro: Modern Masters from the Albright-Knox Art Gallery Opens Oct. 5th-Tampa Museum of Art

Featuring a comprehensive array of fifty-two works across varied media by Jean (Hans) Arp (French, born Germany, 1886–1966), Joan Miró (Spanish, 1893–1983), and Alexander Calder (American, 1898–1976), this exhibition will highlight the work of three modern masters, who pushed color, line, and form beyond convention.

Screen Shot 2013-10-03 at 6.06.17 PMSource: Tampa Art Museum Website

Modern Saints:  Santiago Echeverry– Opens Oct.7th – Reception Oct.17th at HCC Ybor Gallery

The University of Tampa art professor, Colombian-born artist presents an exhibition of digital photography, prints and alternative video at HCC-Ybor’s School of Visual and Performing Arts Gallery. The group of digital photos studies the fears of younger generations and, in particular, the way they have been able to overcome them successfully — all by way of the dichotomy between realism and hyper-pixilation.

Imago: Art Exhibition by Emily Elliott –Opens Oct. 7 at USF Oliver Gallery

This exhibit investigates physical and psychological instincts like self-preservation and protection. The artist visually represents this response to loss and the nature of emotional defense mechanisms, giving physical weight and biological attributes to abstract emotions and psychological responses. Utilizing life-casting in my process, she begins with a human figure whose surface is built up, torn, sliced away and built up again, acting as the metaphorical battle ground on which the struggles of the emotional psyche take form. FREE

Film: 
The Mark of Cain
-Mon, Oct 7 at 7 pm, FAH 101 at USF FAH Building Free event

Join us for a USF premiere showing of Alix Lambert’s documentary The Mark of Cain (2000), filmed in Russia’s notorious prisons, chronicling the vanishing practice of Russian criminal tattoos. Q & A session with Alix Lambert will follow the premiere.

Lecture: 
Safe Return Doubtful
Thurs, Oct 10 at 7 pm
FAH 101 at USF FAH Building, Free event

lambert_lecture

Source: School of Art and Art History USF

The USF School of Art & Art History presents a lecture by Alix Lambert, the 2013 USF Kennedy Family Artist in Residence, based on her chronological exhibition that contained the photographic series The Marriage Project (1993), for which she got married – and divorced – with three men and a woman over a period of six months; the series Male Pattern Baldness (1994); her documentary The Mark of Cain (2000), dealing with the tattoos of Russian criminals and prisoners; and the photography series Crime (2008), about the world of crime through portraits of criminals, victims, judges, and police officers.

Sources: Creative Loafing & USF School of Art and Art History

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